Hypnobirthing Research

Many studies have been done into hypnobirthing with some still ongoing. The results speak for themselves and prove what parents already knew: hypnobirthing works!


Hypnobirthing Courses

 
 

2012: Royal Wolverhampton Hospitals NHS Trust. Presentation to the Royal Society of Medicine

Comparative outcomes between women who had taken a hypnobirthing course and those who had not.


Emergency C-section

General Population 15%

Hypnobirthing mothers 4%


Instrumental Delivery

General Population 11%

Hypnobirthing mothers 8%

 

2009: Abbasi et al, Middlesex, UK - International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis

The effect of hypnosis on pain relief during labour and childbirth in Iranian pregnant women


This study found that the women described their feelings about hypnosis during labor as: a sense of relief and consolation, self-confidence, satisfaction, lack of suffering, labour pain, changing the feeling of pain into one of pressure, a decrease in fear of natural childbirth, lack of tiredness, and lack of anxiety. They expressed increased concentration on the uterus and cervical muscle, awareness of all the stages of labor, and having "positive thoughts." Births were perceived as being very satisfactory compared to their previous experiences.


2007: Vandevuss, J et al, Milwaukee, USA - American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis

Hypnosis for childbirth: a retrospective comparative analysis of outcomes in one obstetrician’s practice


This exploratory, descriptive study, done retrospectively from perinatal medical records, compared childbirth outcomes in one obstetrician's caseload between 50 women who elected ante-partal hypnosis preparation (usually a 5-class series) and 51 who did not. The groups were demographically similar. To achieve similar numbers to the hypnosis group, the control group was randomly selected from the women in the caseload who opted not to take hypnosis preparation, based on characteristics of parity and delivery mode. Prenatal hypnosis preparation resulted in significantly less use of sedatives, analgesia, and regional anesthesia during labor and in higher 1-minute neonatal Apgar scores.


2006: Smith, CA et al, Adelaide, Australia - Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

Complementary and alternative therapies for pain management in labour


Women taught self-hypnosis had decreased requirements for pharmacological analgesia (RR 0.53, 95% CI 0.36 to 0.79, five trials 749 women) including epidural analgesia (RR 0.30, 95% CI 0.22 to 0.40) and were more satisfied with their pain management in labour compared with controls (RR 2.33, 95% CI 1.15 to 4.71, one trial).


2006: Cyan, AM et al, Adelaide, Australia - Anaesthesia and Internsive Care

Antenatal self-hypnosis for labour and childbirth: a pilot study


77 antenatal women consecutively taught self-hypnosis in preparation for childbirth were compared with 3,249 parity and gestational age matched controls.Of the women taught antenatal self-hypnosis, nulliparous parturients used fewer epidurals: 36% (18/50) compared with 53% (765/1436) of controls (RR 0.68 [95%CI 0.47-0.98]); and required less augmentation: 18% (9/50) vs 36% (523/1436) (RR 0.48 [95%CI 0.27-0.90]). CONCLUSIONS: Our clinical findings are consistent with recent meta-analyses showing beneficial outcomes associated with the use of hypnosis in childbirth.


2004: Mehi-Madrona LE, Tuscaon USA - The American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis

Hypnosis to facilitate uncomplicated birth


Women receiving prenatal hypnosis had significantly better outcomes than women who did not. Further assessment suggested that hypnosis worked by preventing negative emotional factors from leading to an complicated birth outcome. The routine prenatal use of hypnosis could improve obstetric outcome. 


Other research papers:

Hao TY, Li YH, Yao
SF. Clinical study on shortening the birth process using psychological suggestion therapy. Zhonghua Hu Li Za Zhi. 1997 Oct; 32(10):568-70. (General Military Hospital of Jinan, P.R. China.)


Jenkins, M.W., & Pritchard, M.H.
Hypnosis: Practical applications and theoretical considerations in normal labour. British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 100(3), 221-226, 1993.


Brann LR, Guzvica SA.
Comparison of hypnosis with conventional relaxation for antenatal and intrapartum use: A feasibility study in general practice. J R Coll Gen Pract 1987; 37:437-440.


Davidson, J, MD.
An assessment of the value of hypnosis in pregnancy and labour. Br Med Journal Oct 13, 1962, 951-953.


Mellegren, A.
Practical experiences with a modified hypnosis-delivery. Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, 14, 425-428, 1966.


Abramson, M., & Heron, W.T.
An objective evaluation of hypnosis in obstetrics: Preliminary report. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 59, 1069-1074, 1950.


Gallagher, S.

Hypnosis for Childbirth: prenatal education and birth outcome. unpublished. June 2001. Davidson, J, MD.


August, R.V.
Obstetric hypnoanesthesia. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 79, 1131-1137, 1960, and August, R.V. Hypnosis in obstetrics. New York: McGraw Hill, 1961.


Hornyak, Lynne M. and Joseph P. Green.
Healing From Within: The use of hypnosis in women's health care. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association, 2000.


Alice A. Martin, PhD; Paul G. Schauble, PhD; Surekha H. Rai, PhD; and R. Whit Curry, Jr, MD
The Effects of Hypnosis on the Labor Processes and Birth Outcomes of Pregnant Adolescents. The Journal of Family Practice, MAY 2001, 50(5): 441-443.


Harmon, T.M., Hynan, M., & Tyre, T.E.
Improved obstetric outcomes using hypnotic analgesia and skill mastery combined with childbirth education. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 58, 525, 530, 1990.


Gallagher, S.
Hypnosis for Childbirth: prenatal education and birth outcome. unpublished. June 2001.


McCarthy, P.
Hypnosis in obstetrics. Australian Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis, 26, 35-42, 1998.



Elective C-section

General Population 10%

Hypnobirthing mothers 4%


Normal Delivery

General Population 64%

Hypnobirthing mothers 84%